A Song By A Soldier – Over there, far away.

Who started the First World War. A man named Princip or an empire called Austro-Hungarian. So much changes over time as history is written and revised. Princip goes from being a member of a Bosnian Youth Movement to being a terrorist.

There’s no doubt that the empire was mighty mad at its little minions who had, for some time, been revving up anti-colonial feelings through articles, posters and meetings. More than one attempt was made to finish off the Duke FF. Princip did it. It wasn’t the only assasination during the early part of the 20th century. So much was going on.

Serbia was in trouble The AH empire decided it was time to get in and sort out the rebels, the Kaiser gave a blank cheque to get it done. It was unpleasant. Bulgaria joined AH and almost finished off the soldiers of Serbia.

Now, the Serb soldiers did an unusual thing. They didn’t surrender, instead they retreated out of Serbia and with the permission of Albania, marched for three winter months down to the Adriatic. The allies said they would meet the soldiers and ensure protection would be given.

The Serbian army was accompanied by King Peter and they took 30,000 boys with aged 12-18. Altogether around 150,000 marched from mid-December 2015 over the mountains and down to the sea.

Many died. Half of the boys died. They had reached the sea but no allies had arrived. German planes bombed them. Soon the allies came and organised for the vast majority of the people to go to Corfu. So they did. Corfu was greeted by as many people as lived on their island.

Food eventually came. Time went by. Those we were ready and fit, readied themselves and with the allies, marched back in to battle.

On Corfu, a soldier wrote a song. It’s quite an important one.

There’s a documentary available as well:

It has English subtitles.

There is also a Serbian museum on Corfu, as well as a church and extensive graveyard.

A special bond was formed with Corfu and France because of their support.

These are 11 of the Oldest Things in the World

Science & Space

All that lives must die—but some organisms get a little more time on this Earth than others. For nearly a decade, the photographer Rachel Sussman has been traveling around the world, capturing images of the oldest continuously living things in the world, part of an effort to “step outside our quotidian experience of time and start to consider a deeper timescale,” as she put it in a TED talk in 2010. Everything she has photographed for the project is at least 2,000 years old, if not much, much older. That includes something as unimaginably ancient as the Posidonia sea grass meadow, found in protected waters in the Mediterranean Sea, which may be 100,000 years old, and something comparatively younger, like baobab trees found in southern Africa. It is a record of survival, of those organisms—and they’re all plants, lichen or coral, as the oldest animals live less than 200 years—that…

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